Celebrating the life of Past President Ivan Goldstein
21/06/2020
Yesterday we assisted with respectfully celebrating the life of Past President Ivan Goldstein. It was our honor to show our respect to the Goldstein family with help from the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Company, the Owings Mills Volunteer Fire Company, and the members of the BCoFD Franklin Station #56 who were able to park along the route to Ivan's final resting place. Ivan you will be missed.
Yesterday we assisted with respectfully celebrating the life of Past President Ivan Goldstein. It was our honor to show our respect to...
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19/07/2021
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Smoke Alarm FAQs
01/06/2020
Did you know that most home fire deaths happen when people are asleep between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.? Don’t let this happen to you. Keep your family safe by installing smoke alarms and testing them monthly to make sure they work. ​ Smoke Alarms and Fire Safety – Did You Know? Three out of five home fire deaths result from fires in properties without working smoke alarms. More than one-third (38 percent) of home fire deaths result from fires in which no smoke alarms are present. The risk of dying in a home fire is cut in half in homes with working smoke alarms. For more information, tips, and resources on Smoke Alarms and Home Fire Safety, check out our smoke alarm safety page! Smoke Alarm FAQs What Types of Alarms Can I Buy There are many brands of smoke alarms on the market, but they fall under two basic types: ionization and photoelectric. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms detect different types of fires. Since no one can predict what type of fire might start in their home, the USFA recommends that every home and place where people sleep have: Both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms. OR Dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors. Choose interconnected smoke alarms, so when one sounds, they all sound. There are also alarms for people with hearing loss. These alarms may have strobe lights that flash and/or vibrate to alert those who are unable to hear standard smoke alarms when they sound. Are Smoke Alarms Expensive Smoke alarms are not expensive and are worth the lives they can help save. Alarm type and cost Ionization and photoelectric: $6 and up Dual sensor: $24 and up Smoke alarms with a microprocessor (faster to alert, fewer false alarms): $30 and up Radio frequency/wireless (communicate from one to the next without wires): $40 and up Your city, county or state may require a specific type of alarm. Please check with your local fire marshal for information on what type of alarm you need.Some fire departments offer reduced-price, or even free, smoke alarms. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information. What Powers a Smoke Alarm? Smoke alarms are powered by battery or by your home’s electrical system. If the smoke alarm is powered by battery, it runs on either a disposable nine-volt battery or a non-replaceable 10-year lithium (“long-life”) battery. Alarms that get power from your home’s electrical system, or “hardwired,” usually have a back-up battery that will need to be replaced once a year. Where Do I Put Alarms In My Home? A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Put smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area. Put alarms on every level of the home. Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. Place smoke alarms on the ceiling or high on the wall. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for the best place for your alarm. Only qualified electricians should install hardwired smoke alarms. Some fire departments will install battery-operated smoke alarms in your home at no cost. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information. What Do I Do If My Alarm Sounds While I'm Cooking? Never take the battery out of your smoke alarm while cooking! If a smoke alarm sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam, do not remove the battery. You should: Open a window or door and press the “hush” button. Wave a towel at the alarm to clear the air. Move the entire alarm several feet away from the kitchen or bathroom Disabling a smoke alarm or removing the battery can be a deadly mistake. How Do I Take Care Of My Alarms? Is your smoke alarm still working? A smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery is the same as having no smoke alarm at all. A smoke alarm only works when it is properly installed and regularly tested. Take care of your smoke alarms according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Below are some general maintenance tips. ​ Smoke alarm powered by a nine-volt battery Test the alarm monthly. Replace the batteries at least once every year. Replace the entire smoke alarm every 10 years. ​​ Smoke alarm powered by a 10-year lithium (or “long-life”) battery Test the alarm monthly. Since you cannot (and should not) replace the lithium battery, replace the entire smoke alarm according to the manufacturer’s instructions. ​​ Smoke alarm that is hardwired into your home’s electrical system Test the alarm monthly. Replace the backup battery at least once every year. Replace the entire smoke alarm every 10 years.
Did you know that most home fire deaths happen when people are asleep between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.? Don’t let this happen to you. Keep your...
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Generator Safety
31/05/2020
Portable generators are useful during power outages. However, many homeowners are unaware that the improper use of portable generators can be risky. The most common dangers associated with portable generators are carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, electrical shock or electrocution, and fire hazards. ​ FACTS ABOUT PORTABLE GENERATORS Downed utility lines, power company blackouts, heavy snowfalls or summer storms can all lead to power outages. Many people turn to a portable generator for a temporary solution without knowing the risks. Generators should be operated in well-ventilated locations outdoors away from all doors, windows and vent openings. Never use a generator in an attached garage, even with the door open. Place generators so that exhaust fumes can’t enter the home through windows, doors or other openings in the building. Make sure to install carbon monoxide (CO) alarms in your home. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for correct placement and mounting height. Turn off generators and let them cool down before refueling. Never refuel a generator while it is running. Store fuel for the generator in a container that is intended for the purpose and is correctly labeled as such. Store the containers outside of living areas.
Portable generators are useful during power outages. However, many homeowners are unaware that the improper use of portable generators...
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31/05/2020
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Winter Home Safety
31/05/2020
Heating is the second leading cause of U.S. home fires, deaths and injuries. December, January and February are the peak months for heating fires. Space heaters are the type of equipment most often involved in home heating equipment fires, figuring in two of every five fires (40%). Here is everything you need to know about keeping your family and home safe from fire this winter season! ​ FACTS ABOUT HOME HEATING FIRES From 2013-2015, an average of 45,900 home heating fires occurred in the United States each year. Heating was the second leading cause of home fires after cooking. Home heating fires peaked in the early evening hours between 5 and 9 p.m. with the highest peak between 6 and 8 p.m. Home heating fires peaked in January (21 percent) and declined to the lowest point from June to August. Confined fires accounted for 75 percent of home heating fires. Twenty-nine percent of the non-confined home heating fires happened because the heat source (like a space heater or fire place) was too close to things that can burn. DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Heating Fire Safety Tips Heating Fire Safety Heating Tips Winter Fire Safety: Heating Your Home Safely Put a Freeze on Winter Fires SAFETY AND YOUR TREE— QUICK TIPS Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heaters. Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters. Never use your oven to heat your home. Always use the right kind of fuel for fuel burning space heaters. Test smoke alarms at least once a month. Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed. Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room Source for Content: U.S. Fire Administration and National Fire Protection Association and Maryland State Firemen's Association
Heating is the second leading cause of U.S. home fires, deaths and injuries. December, January and February are the peak months for...
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01/06/2020
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Holiday Fire Safety
31/05/2020
Christmas trees account for hundreds of fires each year. Typically, shorts in electrical lights or open flames from candles, lighters or matches start tree fires. Well-watered trees are not a problem. A dry and neglected tree can be. Here is everything you need to know about keeping your home and family safe from fires during the holiday season! ​ FACTS ABOUT HOLIDAY HOME FIRE SAFETY One of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems. A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every four of Christmas tree fires. December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. One-third of all candle fires start in the bedroom. SAFETY AND YOUR TREE— QUICK TIPS Natural trees should be cut at a 45 degree angle Place tree away from sources of heat Use only non-flammable decorations Inspect lights for frayed wire or other defects before use Do not leave lights on unattended Keep the tree stand full of water at all times When the tree becomes dry, discard it immediately ​ DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Put a Freeze on Winter Holiday Fires Winter Holiday Fire Safety: Did you Know? Winter Holiday Safety Christmas Tree Safety Tips Source for Content: U.S. Fire Administration and National Fire Protection Association and Maryland State Firemen's Association
Christmas trees account for hundreds of fires each year. Typically, shorts in electrical lights or open flames from candles, lighters or...
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Summer Fire Safety
31/05/2020
Summer is a time for fun, but it is important to make sure you and your family are being cautious when using fireworks, grills, and other potentially dangerous materials. Here is everything you need to know about keeping your family and home safe this summer! SUMMER FIRE STATISTICS In 2014, 16,600 patients went to emergency rooms because of injuries involving grills July is the peak month for grill fires (17%), including both structure, outdoor or unclassified fires, followed by May, June and August Leaks or breaks were the factor in 11% of grill structure fires and 23% of outside and unclassified grill fires Gas grills contribute to a higher number of home fires overall than their charcoal counterparts A failure to clean the grill was the leading factor contributing to the fire in one –fifth of all grill structure fires (19%). In 17%, something that could catch fire was too close to the grill Downloadable Resources Summer Fire Safety Flyer Summertime Burn Safety Flyer Grilling Safety Flyer SUMMERTIME FIRE SAFETY- HELPFUL HINTS Be safe. If you want to see fireworks, go to a public show. Do not use consumer fireworks. Keep a close eye on children at events with fireworks. Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should be used outdoors only. Keep children and pets at least three feet from the grill area. Keep your grill clean by removing grease buildup. Never leave your grill unattended. Always make sure your gas grill lid is open before lighting it. QUICK TIPS TO SHARE Spread the word by sharing these graphics with your family and friends this summer season! We encourage you to print these and also share on social media. Source for Content: U.S. Fire Administration and National Fire Protection Association and Maryland State Firemen's Association
Summer is a time for fun, but it is important to make sure you and your family are being cautious when using fireworks, grills, and other...
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House Fire on Dark Star Way
19/04/2020
At 1:18pm on Wednesday April 15th E461 was alerted for a House fire in the 4700 block of Dark Star Way. Upon arrival, units found a well involved fire which had extended from the garage and was throughout much of the house. E18 pulled a hose line to the garage and E461 pulled a line to the rear of the structure. Due to instability of the roof and heavy fire throughout the home units started with a defensive attack. Units operated on scene for over 2 hours. Units: BC22 E461 E18 E56 T18 A465 E19 M18 E3 FM4 E412 TOW323 E2 AU19 CAN 156 SAFE1 E321 EMS5 E413 S322 CAN156
At 1:18pm on Wednesday April 15th E461 was alerted for a House fire in the 4700 block of Dark Star Way. Upon arrival, units found a well...
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19/04/2020
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House Fire on Lyons Mill Road
16/02/2020
On February 16th just after 6pm units were alerted by a neighbor to a house on fire in the 9800 block on Lyons Mill Road across fr the elementary school. Ambulance 465 arrived first and confirmed smoke and fire showing. Engine 461 arrived shortly after and pulled a line through the front door. E461 made an initial knock on a bulk of the fire. Crews operated for over two and a half hours
On February 16th just after 6pm units were alerted by a neighbor to a house on fire in the 9800 block on Lyons Mill Road across fr the...
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16/02/2020
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Fire Extinguisher Safety
11/02/2020
A portable fire extinguisher can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or containing it until the fire department arrives; but portable extinguishers have limitations. Because fire grows and spreads so rapidly, the #1 priority for residents is to get out safely. Here is what you need to know about choosing and using fire extinguishers! ​ REMEMBER TO CHECK YOUR FIRE EXTINGUISHER FOR: ​ Easy access in an emergency- be sure nothing is blocking or limiting your ability to reach it. The recommended pressure level- many extinguishers have gauges that show when pressure is too high or too low. Working parts- make sure the can, hoses and nozzles aren’t damaged, dented, or rusted. Cleanliness- remove any dust, oil, or grease that might be on the outside of the extinguisher. Guidelines and instructions- some extinguishers need to be shaken monthly, others need to be pressure tested every few years. WHEN TO USE A FIRE EXTINGUISHER Fire extinguishers can be helpful on a small fire. Below is a checklist to help you prepare to use a fire extinguisher. Have I alerted others in the building that there’s a fire? Has someone called the fire department? Am I physically able to use a fire extinguisher? Is the fire small and contained in a single object (like a pan or a wastebasket)? Am I safe from the fire’s toxic smoke? Do I have a clear escape route? Use a fire extinguisher when all of these questions are answered “yes.” If you’re unsure about whether or not it’s safe to use a fire extinguisher, and for all other situations, alert others, leave the building, and call 911 from a mobile or neighbor’s phone. It is not recommended that children use fire extinguishers. ​ HOW TO USE A FIRE EXTINGUISHER When operating a fire extinguisher, tell remember the word PASS. Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you and release the locking mechanism. Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire. Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly. Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side. MORE FIRE EXTINGUISHER TIPS For the home, select a multi-purpose extinguisher (can be used on all types of home fires) that is large enough to put out a small fire, but not so heavy as to be difficult to handle. Choose a fire extinguisher that carries the label of an independent testing laboratory. Read the instructions that come with the fire extinguisher and become familiar with its parts and operation before a fire breaks out. Local fire departments or fire equipment distributors often offer hands-on fire extinguisher trainings. Install fire extinguishers close to an exit and keep your back to a clear exit when you use the device so you can make an easy escape if the fire cannot be controlled. If the room fills with smoke, leave immediately
A portable fire extinguisher can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or containing it until the fire department arrives;...
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16/02/2020
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Home Fire Escape Planning
11/02/2020
Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning.​ Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm. Here are some tips for helping you with your home fire escape plan! Fire drills are important for all homes, including apartment buildings and other high-rise structures. You need to know the basics of escape planning, from identifying two ways out of every room to getting low and going under smoke, and the importance of practicing how you would respond in an emergency. Be aware that sometimes the safest thing you can do in a tall building fire is to stay put and wait for the firefighters. TO INCREASE FIRE SAFETY FOR APARTMENT DWELLERS, NFPA OFFERS THE FOLLOWING GUIDELINES: ​ Know the plan Make sure that you’re familiar with your building’s evacuation plan, which should illustrate what residents are supposed to do in the event of an emergency. The evacuation plan should be posted in places where all residents can see and review it, and the building management should hold a fire drill with occupants at least once a year. Most states also require that buildings periodically test their fire safety systems as well.  Be sure to participate when your building drills take place. When looking for an apartment or high-rise home, look for one with an automatic sprinkler system. Sprinklers can extinguish a home fire in less time that it takes for the fire department to arrive. Practice is key Whether your building has one floor or 50, it’s essential that you and your family are prepared to respond to a fire alarm. Identify all of the exits in your building and if you are using an escape planning grid, mark them on your escape plan. Make sure to mark the various stairways too, in case one is blocked by fire. Never use the elevator In case of fire, always use the stairs to get out, never the elevator. Make sure to practice using the stairs as part of your escape plan. If someone in your family has difficulty climbing down steps, make sure to incorporate a contingency for this into your plan. Stay low Smoke from a fire is toxic and deadly no matter what kind of structure you live in. When you hold your fire drill, everyone in the family should practice getting low and going under the smoke to the exit. In the event of a fire, if both stairwells are filled with smoke, stay in your apartment and wait for the firefighters. Seal yourself in for safety If you can’t exit an apartment building due to smoke or fire in the hallway, call the fire department to report your exact location and gather in a room with a window to await their arrival. Close all doors between you and the fire. Use duct tape or towels to create a seal around the door and over air vents in order to keep smoke from coming in. Stay by the window If possible, you should open your windows at the top and the bottom so fresh air can get in. Don’t break the window – if smoke enters the room from outside the building, you won’t be able to protect yourself. Signal to firefighters Wave a flashlight or light colored cloth at the window to let the fire department know where you are located. MAKE EVERY SECOND COUNT! – HELPFUL HINTS Draw a map of your home by using this grid in English (PDF) or Spanish (PDF) with all members of your household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit. Practice your home fire drill twice a year. Conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in your home, and practice using different ways out. Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them. Make sure the number of your home is clearly marked and easy for the fire department to find. Close doors behind you as you leave – this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire. Once you get outside, stay outside. Never go back inside a burning building. DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Have a Fire Drill: Escape Planning Grid Have a Fire Drill Bookmark Up in Smoke Poster Up in Smoke Flyer Home Safety Checklist Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out How to Make a Home Fire Escape Plan
Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning.​ Fire can spread rapidly through your home,...
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16/02/2020
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Carbon Monoxide Safety
11/02/2020
Although the popularity of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms has been growing in recent years, it cannot be assumed that everyone is familiar with the hazards of carbon monoxide poisoning in the home. ​ Often called the invisible killer, carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas created when fuels (such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel are potential sources of carbon monoxide. Vehicles or generators running in an attached garage can also produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide. ​ CARBON MONOXIDE FACTS The dangers of CO exposure depend on a number of variables, including the victim’s health and activity level. Infants, pregnant women, and people with physical conditions that limit their body’s ability to use oxygen (i.e. emphysema, asthma, heart disease) can be more severely affected by lower concentrations of CO than healthy adults would be. A person can be poisoned by a small amount of CO over a longer period of time or by a large amount of CO over a shorter amount of time. In 2010, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 80,100 non-fire CO incidents in which carbon monoxide was found, or an average of nine such calls per hour.  The number of incidents increased 96 % from 40,900 incidents reported in 2003. This increase is most likely due to the increased use of CO detectors, which alert people to the presence of CO. DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Portable Generators & Winter Storms Safty Flyer Carbon Monoxide Safety Flyer CO TOOLKIT Source for Content:  U.S. Fire Administration and National Fire Protection Association  and Maryland State Firemen's Association
Although the popularity of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms has been growing in recent years, it cannot be assumed that everyone is familiar...
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16/02/2020
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Smoke Alarm Safety
11/02/2020
Smoke alarms save lives. Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. Smoke Alarms Facts In 2012-2016, smoke alarms sounded in more than half (53%) of the home fires reported to U.S. fire departments. Almost three of every five home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms (40%) or no working smoke alarms (17%). No smoke alarms were present in two out of every five (40%) home fire deaths. The death rate per 1,000 reported home fires was more than twice as high in homes that did not have any working smoke alarms compared to the rate in homes with working smoke alarms (12.3 deaths vs. 5.7 deaths per 1,000 fires). In fires in which the smoke alarms were present but did not operate, more than two of every five (43%) of the smoke alarms had missing or disconnected batteries. Dead batteries caused one-quarter (25%) of the smoke alarm failures. Smoke Alarm Safety- Everything You Need to Know A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. Large homes may need extra smoke alarms. Test your smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working. There are two kinds of alarms. Ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires. Photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. It is best to use of both types of alarms in the home. When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside. Replace all smoke alarms in your home every 10 years. Smoke alarms are not expensive and are worth the lives they can help save. A  smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery is the same as having no smoke alarm at all. A smoke alarm only works when it is properly installed and regularly tested. Take care of your smoke alarms according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For more information and resources on Smoke Alarms, check out our Smoke Alarm FAQs! DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Up In Smoke Handout Hear the Beep Where You Sleep Don’t Wait- Check the Date! Resources for families Handout Source for Content:  U.S. Fire Administration and National Fire Protection Association  and Maryland State Firemen's Association
Smoke alarms save lives. Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries....
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16/02/2020
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Liberty Road Responds to Windsor Mill House Fire
25/01/2020
On January 20th just after 2 p.m units from Liberty Road Volunteer Fire Company were dispatched to the single-family residence. Engine 461 arrived and found heavy smoke showing. Because the house is located in an area without hydrants, tankers were dispatched to supply additional water to extinguish the fire. Firefighters from Engine 3 found the victim just inside the front door on the main level of the home. He was transported to a local hospital, where he later died. A large portion of the first floor collapsed into the basement, necessitating the evacuation of fire personnel and hindering attempts by Baltimore County fire investigators to examine the scene. The fire remains under investigation.
On January 20th just after 2 p.m units from Liberty Road Volunteer Fire Company were dispatched to the single-family residence. Engine...
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25/01/2020
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MVC at Owings Mills Blvd
05/10/2019
E461 responded with units from Station 18 for a motor vehicle collision with rescue at the intersection of Liberty Road and Owings Mills Blvd. E461 arrived to find two vehicles involved in a collision. Ambo 315 was added to the call due to multiple patients. In total 3 patients were transported to hospitals. Units operated on scene for 30 minutes.
E461 responded with units from Station 18 for a motor vehicle collision with rescue at the intersection of Liberty Road and Owings Mills...
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18/01/2020
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LRVFC Participates in National Night Out
22/08/2019
National Night Out was great! We look forward to seeing you next year on August 4th 2020 so save the date!
National Night Out was great! We look forward to seeing you next year on August 4th 2020 so save the date!
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22/08/2019
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We Are Hiring EMTs
22/08/2019
We have begun hiring please review the attached flyer and share it among your EMS providers. Contact Recruitment@LRVFC.org for more information
We have begun hiring please review the attached flyer and share it among your EMS providers. Contact Recruitment@LRVFC.org for more...
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01/01/2020
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Shop on Amazon Smile
22/08/2019
School is right around the corner, go to smile.amazon.com/ch/52-0783087 to support us as your local volunteer fire company while you shop. It costs you nothing financially and its just a click away while you shop.
School is right around the corner, go to smile.amazon.com/ch/52-0783087 to support us as your local volunteer fire company while you...
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22/08/2019
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Motor Vehicle Collision on Old Court Rd
18/07/2019
On Thursday July 11th at 3:15 pm Engine 461 was alert to a motor vehicle collision blocking traffic on the 9300 Block of Old Court Road. Units arrived to find two vehicles involved. Luckily no one was injured and everyone refused treatment.
On Thursday July 11th at 3:15 pm Engine 461 was alert to a motor vehicle collision blocking traffic on the 9300 Block of Old Court Road. ...
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22/08/2019
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Universal Security Instruments Recalls to Inspect Smoke Alarms Due to Risk of Failure to Alert
17/07/2019
This recall involves Universal Security Instruments 10 year battery-operated ionization smoke and fire alarms with model numbers MI3050S and MI3050SB and with date codes between 2015JAN19 through 2016JUL11. The smoke alarms are white in color and 5½  inches in diameter.  “Universal” and “Smoke & Fire Alarm” are printed on the front cover of the alarm. The label on the back of the alarm lists the model number and date code. Consumers should immediately inspect their smoke alarms to determine if it will activate appropriately.  Press the test button to determine if it is operating properly.  If the alarm sounds no further action is required.  Additional instructions are located on the firm’s website.  If smoke alarm does not sound during the test, consumers should immediately contact Universal Security for a replacement. More information can be found at https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2019/Universal-Security-Instruments-Recalls-to-Inspect-Smoke-Alarms-Due-to-Risk-of-Failure-to-Alert-Consumers-to-a-Fire
This recall involves Universal Security Instruments 10 year battery-operated ionization smoke and fire alarms with model numbers MI3050S...
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18/01/2020
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Flea Market
17/07/2019
It's time for the annual flea markets at LRVFC. Beginning April 13,2019 & continuing every 2nd Saturday of the month until September 14th, 2019. Flea Market opens at 9:00 am and closes at 2 pm. (Setup time for vendors is at 7:30 am) 10' x 10' space - $10 1 chair $5 Refreshments will be available for purchase.
It's time for the annual flea markets at LRVFC. Beginning April 13,2019 & continuing every 2nd Saturday of the month until September...
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17/07/2019
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Scam Alert
17/07/2019
It has come to our attention that citizens within our first-due area have been receiving phone calls soliciting donations "for your local volunteer firefighters". The caller or callers may also claim to represent the Baltimore County Volunteer Firemen's Association (BCVFA). Neither the BCVFA nor *ANY* of its member companies (including Liberty Road Volunteer Fire Co.) *EVER* solicits donations via phone. In order to help us stop such solicitations, if you get a call, please get the person's name and number (if you can) and forward that information to us via email at info@lrvfc.org or notify us through FaceBook. To donate see our "Donate" page. As always, thank you for your support and assistance.
It has come to our attention that citizens within our first-due area have been receiving phone calls soliciting donations "for your local...
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17/07/2019
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